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Welcome to UCT Anthropology
The department is situated in AC Jordan Building on UCT's Upper Campus.
Medicine and the Arts: Humanising Healthcare
UCT's first MOOC was created by Professor Steve Reid and Anthropology's own Associate Professor Susan Levine.

News

Monday, 22 October 2018
Distinguished teachers share their recipes

Four outstanding teachers are receiving Distinguished Teacher Awards at the December graduation ceremonies, marking the 32nd anniversary of the awards. Deputy Vice-Chancellor Professor Sandra Klopper said the honour is "the highest accolade given to UCT lecturing staff in acknowledgement of the value we attach to teaching and learning in the university's work". Here are excerpts from the motivations for their respective awards.

Publication Date:
Monday, December 9, 2013 - 11:45
Nyamnjoh is 2013's 'African Hero'

Internationally-recognised anthropologist, UCT's Professor Francis Nyamnjoh was named African Hero of the Year for 2013 by the African Student Union of Ohio University, US, in March.

The student union's annual African Hero Day celebration honours one person from the continent that has made a significant contribution to improving the lives of its inhabitants.

Publication Date:
Thursday, April 11, 2013 - 11:45
Hope and dignity the cornerstones of new book

Raw Life, New Hope: Decency, housing and everyday life in a post-apartheid community, by Associate Professor Fiona Ross of the Department of Social Anthropology, doesn't skimp on the scholarly rigour.

But it's also the kind of book that Ross wants the lay reader and occasional book club - tick that box - to pick up between the Austens and travelogues. So in telling the fly-on-the-wall story, chronicled over 13 years, of the residents of local shantytown The Park, Ross has tried to capture the little details of life in the community that illustrate how people create meaning in their lives.

Publication Date:
Friday, November 6, 2009 - 11:45
Hope and dignity the cornerstones of new book

Raw Life, New Hope: Decency, housing and everyday life in a post-apartheid community, by Associate Professor Fiona Ross of the Department of Social Anthropology, doesn't skimp on the scholarly rigour.

But it's also the kind of book that Ross wants the lay reader and occasional book club - tick that box - to pick up between the Austens and travelogues. So in telling the fly-on-the-wall story, chronicled over 13 years, of the residents of local shantytown The Park, Ross has tried to capture the little details of life in the community that illustrate how people create meaning in their lives.

Publication Date:
Friday, November 6, 2009 - 11:45

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